Alesis QuadraSynth

Alesis Quadrasynth Image

The QuadraSynth was introduced in 1993 by Alesis, and it was their first major synthesizer. It's a 64-voice, 76-key digital synthesizer that also came in a rack-mountable version: the S4 Sound Module. It had a whopping 16 MB of sample ROM, and was the first synth to offer the ADAT Optical Digital interface. It also featured the same multi-effects processor as the QuadraVerb 2, drum kits based on the D4 drum module, 4 assignable control knobs, one PCMCIA card slot, 48kHz clock input, and 4 audio outputs.

The QuadraSynth is undoubtedly a powerful and flexible synthesizer capable of creating rich sounds - both acoustic and electronic. It uses digital additive/subtractive sample playback synthesis to create high quality stereo grand pianos, organs, strings, drums/percussion, brass, woodwinds, new and classic synth textures, and more.

Released in 1995/1996 came the new and improved QuadraSynth Plus synthesizer. The QuadraSynth Plus has more ROM (24MB expandable to 32), many more program patches (640) and mixes (500). The General MIDI library has been added, as well as an 8MB stereo Grand Piano sample (also found in the stream-lined QS7, QS8, QS6.1, QS7.1, QS8.1 and QSR models), and a PCMCIA expansion slot. For an all around versatile modern synthesizer that isn't focused just on dance or trance, be sure to consider the QuadraSynths.

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31 Visitor comments
bill
August 9, 2009 @ 4:27 am
i hate this thing. jumpy knobs. bad display and well just horrible horrible interface.
it is however the toughest best designed big 76 key monster of a keyboard complete with a handy handle to carry it with you can get for under two hundred bucks.
not for twiddlers or slider geeks.
sounds very dark at times and if you sit down and take deep deep breaths this sounds every bit as good as a wave station.
really it does.
Oneki Kai
February 6, 2009 @ 12:23 am
The QS x.1 and x.2 (6, 7, 8) keyboards are sleeper hits. I wouldn't bother with non .1 and .2 boards or the rackmounts unless you can get one for less than $150. The filter is a simple non-resonant low pass, but there are resonant samples in memory.

Sound wise this thing is staggering! While the Roland JV-1080 (same time period) has a much more powerful synthesis and effects engine, the QS has a very well polished and rounded-out set of sounds to provide a basic palette with which to build on. The QS 8.1 makes a killer MIDI controller too.

I don't understand why VSE rates it at three stars...the quality of the sounds and the expansion cards more than makes up for the lack of synthesis options.

http://synthmania.com/qs8.htm
Oneki Kai
February 6, 2009 @ 12:21 am
The QS x.1 and x.2 (6, 7, 8) keyboards are sleeper hits. I wouldn't bother with non .1 and .2 boards or the rackmounts unless you can get one for less than $150. The filter is a simple non-resonant low pass, but there are resonant samples in memory.

Sound wise this thing is staggering! While the Roland JV-1080 (same time period) has a much more powerful synthesis and effects engine, the QS has a very well polished and rounded-out set of outs to provide a basic palette with which to build on. The QS 8.1 makes a killer MIDI controller too.

I don't understand why VSE rates it at three stars...the quality of the sounds and the expansion cards more than makes up for the lack of synthesis options.
planetplayer
January 13, 2009 @ 2:01 am
It has nice sounds Filter is simple.
A favourite.
Rick Tofte
January 4, 2009 @ 7:58 pm
I have had My QS+ Piano for 10 years.
With a good amplifier and speakers, close to a real piano sound.
I have a good set of PC speaks and put them on top and it is neat.
You can get lost in the library of over 1000s of sounds programed.
Put another 8 banks of 128 programed sounds on a PCMCIA card.
Making your own is possible, but tedious without software developed for it. The editing/library software for it is available.
I would put the value of a nice QS+ at $400
 
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Rated 3.2 (206 Votes)

  • Check Prices on eBay
  • The link above will take you to a search for this synth to see active listings. If you don't find it there, try looking in our forum marketplace or post a wanted classified.
  • Specifications
  • Polyphony - 64 voices
  • Oscillators - 48kHz Linear samples
    QS: 16MB, expandable to 24MB using PCMCIA ROM and RAM cards
    QS Plus: 24MB, expandable to 32MB using PCMCIA ROM and RAM cards
  • Multitimbral - 16 parts
  • Effects - 4 On-board effects, based on the Alesis QuadraVerb 2 FX processor
  • Arpeg/Seq - None
  • Keyboard - 76 velocity and aftertouch sensitive, semi-weighted, synth-action
  • Memory - QS: 128 preset 128 user programs, 100 preset, 100 user mixes
    QS Plus: 512 preset 128 user programs, 400 preset, 100 user mixes
  • Control - MIDI IN/OUT/THRU (16-channels)
  • Date Produced - 1993 (QuadraSynth)
    1995 (QuadraSynth Plus)

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