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Half the fun of synthesizers, vintage or otherwise, is simply owning one or two and playing around with them for personal enjoyment.

If you have racks full of expensive dynamic compressors and found that they do not end up as part of your creative process, then you are not alone.

In the first part of our article we took a look at some unusual and innovative MIDI controllers, such as the Buchla Thunder, AlphaSphere, MI-MU Gloves and Crystal Ball.

Thanks to software synthesizers, it has become easier and more convenient than ever before to create your own music.

Recent synth reviews

If you are looking for a MIDI synthesizer that can also provide you with the feel as well as the sound of a real piano, then the Ensoniq KT-88 fits the bill. This workstation was released in 1994 and…
The Cheetah MS800 is a digital wave synthesizer that was designed for the company by Mike Lynch of Lynett Systems. It wasn't a big success when it was first released in 1989, despite being very…
The XR10 is a budget drum machine that was released by Akai in the early nineties. While it is not exactly a contender for the top drum machine ever released, it was a big improvement on Akai's XE8,…
The VSS-200 was first released in 1988 by the Yamaha Corporation as part of their PortaSound series. This series was made up by the VSS-100, VSS-200, and VSS-30, with all of them being sampling…
The Roland Fantom series started with a bit of an uphill battle when it was first released as it lacked features, such as user sampling, compared to Korg, Yamaha and other brands. Roland quickly…