Companies have always gone to great lengths to market their products, which often resulted in adverts that were completely over the top.

Sponsored Post: Buying a new synthesizer, whether it is your first one ever, an upgrade for your existing one, or simply the latest addition to your collection, is exciting.

In addition to enabling synth fans from across the world to form online communities as well as collaborate, the Internet has also brought plenty of other benefits synthesizer enthusiasts.

Just like any other musical instrument, it is much easier to learn how to play a synthesizer if you are having fun. Thankfully, we live in a day and age where just about any information you need can be accessed almost immediately, which makes it a lot easier to master certain skills, such as playing synths.

Buying a ton of vintage gear is one thing, but you are going to need both the space to store everything and some sort of surface to place them on when using them.

Recent synth reviews

Roland released their very first music workstation in 1988 in the form of the Roland W-30. It was one of the very first workstations that was self-contained and came with a large sample library…
The Yamaha A3000 is a professional hardware sampler released by the company in 1997. Back then the company was exactly known for sampling, so the release of the A3000 was an unexpected one. The goal…
Announced at SuperBooth 2017, Peak is Novation's new 8-voice polysynth packed with a surprising set of features that make it a versatile addition to any synthesizer arsenal. Peak was designed by…
Ampron Aubade is a very rare analog monophonic 3-octave flip-top style synthesizer which remains a mystery to even many collectors in the synth world... It is mentioned briefly in the A to Z guide to…
Possibly the single most hated Drum Machine/Synthesizer ever produced, the Akai Rhythm Wolf is a fully analog 4 voice drum machine, 1 voice bass synthesizer that polarizes the synth community to this…